Axon AI Ethics Board

CARMEN BEST

Chief Carmen Best served as the Chief of Police for the Seattle Police Department. Carmen was the first African American woman to hold that position, getting overwhelming community support for the job. She is currently an MSNBC contributor.

CARMEN BEST

Chief Carmen Best served as the Chief of Police for the Seattle Police Department. Carmen was the first African American woman to hold that position, getting overwhelming community support for the job. She is currently an MSNBC contributor.

BARRY FRIEDMAN

Barry Friedman serves as the Director of the Policing Project at New York University School of Law, where he is the Jacob D. Fuchsberg Professor of Law and Affiliated Professor of Politics. The Policing Project is dedicated to strengthening policing through ordinary democratic processes; it drafts best practices and policies for policing agencies, including on issues of technology and surveillance, assists with transparency, conducts cost-benefit analysis of policing practices, and leads engagement efforts between policing agencies and communities. Friedman has taught, litigated, and written about constitutional law, the federal courts, policing, and criminal procedure for over thirty years. He serves as the Reporter for the American Law Institute’s new Principles of the Law, Policing. Friedman is the author of Unwarranted: Policing Without Permission(Farrar, Straus and Giroux, February 2017), and has written numerous articles in scholarly journals, including on Democratic Policing and the Fourth Amendment. He appears frequently in the popular media, including theNew York Times,Slate,Huffington Post, Politico and the New Republic.He also is the author of the critically acclaimedThe Will of the People: How Public Opinion Has Influenced the Supreme Court and Shaped the Meaning of the Constitution(2009). Friedman graduated with honors from the University of Chicago and received his law degree magna cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center. He clerked for Judge Phyllis A. Kravitch of the US Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit.

BARRY FRIEDMAN

Barry Friedman serves as the Director of the Policing Project at New York University School of Law, where he is the Jacob D. Fuchsberg Professor of Law and Affiliated Professor of Politics. The Policing Project is dedicated to strengthening policing through ordinary democratic processes; it drafts best practices and policies for policing agencies, including on issues of technology and surveillance, assists with transparency, conducts cost-benefit analysis of policing practices, and leads engagement efforts between policing agencies and communities. Friedman has taught, litigated, and written about constitutional law, the federal courts, policing, and criminal procedure for over thirty years. He serves as the Reporter for the American Law Institute’s new Principles of the Law, Policing. Friedman is the author of Unwarranted: Policing Without Permission(Farrar, Straus and Giroux, February 2017), and has written numerous articles in scholarly journals, including on Democratic Policing and the Fourth Amendment. He appears frequently in the popular media, including theNew York Times,Slate,Huffington Post, Politico and the New Republic.He also is the author of the critically acclaimedThe Will of the People: How Public Opinion Has Influenced the Supreme Court and Shaped the Meaning of the Constitution(2009). Friedman graduated with honors from the University of Chicago and received his law degree magna cum laude from Georgetown University Law Center. He clerked for Judge Phyllis A. Kravitch of the US Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit.

CHARLIE BECK

Chief Charlie Beck led two major police departments in the United States. He was Chief of the LAPD and served as the interim Superintendent of the Chicago Police Department. One of Charlie’s many accomplishments is reforming the Rampart Division after the scandal that engulfed the department in the late 1990s and improving the relationship between the community and the LAPD in South LA.

CHARLIE BECK

Chief Charlie Beck led two major police departments in the United States. He was Chief of the LAPD and served as the interim Superintendent of the Chicago Police Department. One of Charlie’s many accomplishments is reforming the Rampart Division after the scandal that engulfed the department in the late 1990s and improving the relationship between the community and the LAPD in South LA.

CHRIS HARRIS

Chris Harris is a native Texan and passionate advocate working to transform the criminal legal system. He currently serves as a Campaign Coordinator for Texas Appleseed, a public interest nonprofit that promotes social and economic justice for all Texans, and as a Public Safety Commissioner representing District 1 in the City of Austin. Chris has led and contributed to winning campaigns aimed at limiting: racial disparities in the criminal justice system, state violence, unnecessary arrests, ICE detentions, pre-trial incarceration, subpar indigent defense and further investment in police and prisons. Chris is an alumnus of Austin College where he studied political science and international relations. Previously, Chris worked in the software industry with a focus on public sector solutions and held various roles, including analyst, consultant, and product manager.

CHRIS HARRIS

Chris Harris is a native Texan and passionate advocate working to transform the criminal legal system. He currently serves as a Campaign Coordinator for Texas Appleseed, a public interest nonprofit that promotes social and economic justice for all Texans, and as a Public Safety Commissioner representing District 1 in the City of Austin. Chris has led and contributed to winning campaigns aimed at limiting: racial disparities in the criminal justice system, state violence, unnecessary arrests, ICE detentions, pre-trial incarceration, subpar indigent defense and further investment in police and prisons. Chris is an alumnus of Austin College where he studied political science and international relations. Previously, Chris worked in the software industry with a focus on public sector solutions and held various roles, including analyst, consultant, and product manager.

DANIELLE CITRON

Danielle Citron is a Jefferson Scholars Foundation Schenck Distinguished Professor of Law, at the
University of Virginia School of Law. She teaches and writes about information privacy, free expression, and civil rights. Professor Citron is the Vice President of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative and sits on the Board of Electronic Privacy Information and the Future of Privacy. Professor Citron advises federal and state legislators, law enforcement, and international lawmakers on privacy issues. She has presented her research more than 300 times, including at federal agencies, meetings of the National Association of Attorneys General, the National Holocaust Museum, the Anti- Defamation League, Wikimedia Foundation, universities, companies, and think tanks.

DANIELLE CITRON

Danielle Citron is a Jefferson Scholars Foundation Schenck Distinguished Professor of Law, at the
University of Virginia School of Law. She teaches and writes about information privacy, free expression, and civil rights. Professor Citron is the Vice President of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative and sits on the Board of Electronic Privacy Information and the Future of Privacy. Professor Citron advises federal and state legislators, law enforcement, and international lawmakers on privacy issues. She has presented her research more than 300 times, including at federal agencies, meetings of the National Association of Attorneys General, the National Holocaust Museum, the Anti- Defamation League, Wikimedia Foundation, universities, companies, and think tanks.

GILES HERDALE

Giles Herdale is the co-chair of the UK Independent Digital Ethics Panel for Policing (IDEPP), which works to explain the importance of ethics in digital policing and ensuring UK police forces factor ethics into their digital policing programs from the outset. He is an associate fellow at the Royal United Services Institute and served as the Program Director for Digital Intelligence and Investigation at the National Police Chiefs’ Council and was the National Digital Intelligence and Investigation Strategy Lead for Essex Police.

GILES HERDALE

Giles Herdale is the co-chair of the UK Independent Digital Ethics Panel for Policing (IDEPP), which works to explain the importance of ethics in digital policing and ensuring UK police forces factor ethics into their digital policing programs from the outset. He is an associate fellow at the Royal United Services Institute and served as the Program Director for Digital Intelligence and Investigation at the National Police Chiefs’ Council and was the National Digital Intelligence and Investigation Strategy Lead for Essex Police.

JEREMY GILLULA

Dr. Gillula began his career in academia doing research in the fields of robotics and machine learning. As a participant in the DARPA Desert Grand Challenge, he did work on computer vision systems and sensor fusion systems for unmanned autonomous ground vehicles. During his doctorate, his research focused on how to design guaranteed safe control algorithms for hybrid systems, with a focus on unmanned aerial vehicles. His thesis focused on the design of guaranteed-safe machine learning systems, fusing control theoretic and machine learning techniques. Since finishing his Ph.D., Dr. Gillula has turned his attention to the intersection of technology and civil liberties issues, including mobile devices, big data, net neutrality, and algorithmic fairness and transparency. He provides technical expertise to lawyers and activists who work on digital civil liberties, and has given a multitude of talks to conferences, invited groups, and policymakers. Dr. Gillula holds a B.S. in Computer Science with a minor in Control and Dynamical Systems from Caltech, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University.

JEREMY GILLULA

Dr. Gillula began his career in academia doing research in the fields of robotics and machine learning. As a participant in the DARPA Desert Grand Challenge, he did work on computer vision systems and sensor fusion systems for unmanned autonomous ground vehicles. During his doctorate, his research focused on how to design guaranteed safe control algorithms for hybrid systems, with a focus on unmanned aerial vehicles. His thesis focused on the design of guaranteed-safe machine learning systems, fusing control theoretic and machine learning techniques. Since finishing his Ph.D., Dr. Gillula has turned his attention to the intersection of technology and civil liberties issues, including mobile devices, big data, net neutrality, and algorithmic fairness and transparency. He provides technical expertise to lawyers and activists who work on digital civil liberties, and has given a multitude of talks to conferences, invited groups, and policymakers. Dr. Gillula holds a B.S. in Computer Science with a minor in Control and Dynamical Systems from Caltech, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University.

MECOLE MCBRIDE

Mecole McBride began her non-profit career in 2006, volunteering for a campaign to reduce the criminalization of individuals with drug addiction. She quickly became entrenched in the work, supervising reentry and violence prevention programs that provided comprehensive wraparound support for the formerly incarcerated and at-risk youth. She later began local and statewide organizing, conducting organizing and racial equity training for community organizations and parents engaged in education reform. She has gained significant experience working with and building broad-based coalitions for local and statewide reform efforts, particularly around Police Reform and Racial Equity.

MECOLE MCBRIDE

Mecole McBride began her non-profit career in 2006, volunteering for a campaign to reduce the criminalization of individuals with drug addiction. She quickly became entrenched in the work, supervising reentry and violence prevention programs that provided comprehensive wraparound support for the formerly incarcerated and at-risk youth. She later began local and statewide organizing, conducting organizing and racial equity training for community organizations and parents engaged in education reform. She has gained significant experience working with and building broad-based coalitions for local and statewide reform efforts, particularly around Police Reform and Racial Equity.

Ryan Calo

Ryan Calo is a law professor at the University of Washington where he holds adjunct appointments in computer science and information science.  He is a nationally recognized expert in privacy law and the legal aspects of the robotics and artificial intelligence.  Prior to law school at the University of Michigan, Calo investigated allegations of police misconduct in New York City.

Ryan Calo

Ryan Calo is a law professor at the University of Washington where he holds adjunct appointments in computer science and information science.  He is a nationally recognized expert in privacy law and the legal aspects of the robotics and artificial intelligence.  Prior to law school at the University of Michigan, Calo investigated allegations of police misconduct in New York City.

MILES BRUNDAGE

Miles Brundage is a Research Scientist at OpenAI and Research Associate at the University of Oxford's Future of Humanity Institute. He researches the governance challenges associated with artificial intelligence (AI), especially those related to AI's impact on security. Recently, Brundage was the lead author of a report, "The Malicious Use of Artificial Intelligence: Forecasting, Prevention, and Mitigation," which received widespread news coverage and has been cited by both the U.S. Congress and the U.K. Parliament. Brundage has published widely in conference proceedings, journals, books, and magazines on a range of AI-related topics. His publications include a review of the field of deep reinforcement learning (a research area in AI), a proposed framework for responsibility in AI development, and an analysis of challenges associated with imbuing AI systems with human values. Prior to beginning his work on AI and governance in 2012, Brundage served for two years as Special Assistant to the Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) and Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition to his research position at Oxford, Brundage is a Ph.D. candidate in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology at Arizona State University, and serves on the editorial staff of the Journal of Responsible Innovation.

MILES BRUNDAGE

Miles Brundage is a Research Scientist at OpenAI and Research Associate at the University of Oxford's Future of Humanity Institute. He researches the governance challenges associated with artificial intelligence (AI), especially those related to AI's impact on security. Recently, Brundage was the lead author of a report, "The Malicious Use of Artificial Intelligence: Forecasting, Prevention, and Mitigation," which received widespread news coverage and has been cited by both the U.S. Congress and the U.K. Parliament. Brundage has published widely in conference proceedings, journals, books, and magazines on a range of AI-related topics. His publications include a review of the field of deep reinforcement learning (a research area in AI), a proposed framework for responsibility in AI development, and an analysis of challenges associated with imbuing AI systems with human values. Prior to beginning his work on AI and governance in 2012, Brundage served for two years as Special Assistant to the Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) and Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition to his research position at Oxford, Brundage is a Ph.D. candidate in Human and Social Dimensions of Science and Technology at Arizona State University, and serves on the editorial staff of the Journal of Responsible Innovation.

REBEKAH DESOL

Dr. Rebekah Delsol has worked for twenty years on anti-discrimination and racial justice issues, with specific applications to changing structures and cultures in police institutions globally. She is a founding member and trustee of the charity StopWatch, a coalition that uses research and action to promote fair and accountable policing. Rebekah manages the Open Society Justice Initiatives’ Fair and Effective Policing (FEP) project, working to improve police relations with diverse communities through dialogue, research, litigation and advocacy.

REBEKAH DESOL

Dr. Rebekah Delsol has worked for twenty years on anti-discrimination and racial justice issues, with specific applications to changing structures and cultures in police institutions globally. She is a founding member and trustee of the charity StopWatch, a coalition that uses research and action to promote fair and accountable policing. Rebekah manages the Open Society Justice Initiatives’ Fair and Effective Policing (FEP) project, working to improve police relations with diverse communities through dialogue, research, litigation and advocacy.

WAEL ABD-ALMAGEED

Dr. Abd-Almageed is a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and a research Team Leader and Supervising Computer Scientist with Information Sciences Institute, both are units of USC Viterbi School of Engineering. His research interests include representation learning, debiasing and fair representations, multimedia forensics and visual misinformation (including deepfake and image manipulation detection) and biometrics. Prior to joining ISI, Dr. Abd-Almageed was a research scientist with the University of Maryland at College Park, where he leads several research efforts for various NSF, DARPA and IARPA programs. He obtained his Ph.D. with Distinction from the University of New Mexico in 2003 where he was also awarded the Outstanding Graduate Student award. He has two patents and over 70 publications in top computer vision and high performance computing conferences and journals. Dr. Almageed is the recipient of the 2019 USC Information Sciences Institute Achievement Award.

WAEL ABD-ALMAGEED

Dr. Abd-Almageed is a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and a research Team Leader and Supervising Computer Scientist with Information Sciences Institute, both are units of USC Viterbi School of Engineering. His research interests include representation learning, debiasing and fair representations, multimedia forensics and visual misinformation (including deepfake and image manipulation detection) and biometrics. Prior to joining ISI, Dr. Abd-Almageed was a research scientist with the University of Maryland at College Park, where he leads several research efforts for various NSF, DARPA and IARPA programs. He obtained his Ph.D. with Distinction from the University of New Mexico in 2003 where he was also awarded the Outstanding Graduate Student award. He has two patents and over 70 publications in top computer vision and high performance computing conferences and journals. Dr. Almageed is the recipient of the 2019 USC Information Sciences Institute Achievement Award.

WARREN STANLEY

Commissioner Warren Stanley recently stepped down as the Commissioner of the California Highway Patrol, the largest state police agency in the U.S. with 11,000 employees, making it the 5th largest law enforcement agency in the country. He was the first African American to hold that position. This is our first state police leader to serve on the board, adding a different perspective on law enforcement.

WARREN STANLEY

Commissioner Warren Stanley recently stepped down as the Commissioner of the California Highway Patrol, the largest state police agency in the U.S. with 11,000 employees, making it the 5th largest law enforcement agency in the country. He was the first African American to hold that position. This is our first state police leader to serve on the board, adding a different perspective on law enforcement.